School of Civil Engineering and Environmental Science 

Randall Kolar, Director
Gerald Miller, Associate Director
Amy B. Cerato, Graduate Liaison
334 Carson Engineering Center
Norman, OK 73019-1024
Phone: (405) 325-5911
FAX: (405) 325-4217
email: cees@ou.edu
Internet:http://www.ou.edu/coe/cees.html

General Information

Faculty Roster 

Professors Butler, Cerato, Hong, Kibbey, Knox, Kolar, G. Miller, Muraleetharan, Nairn, Nanny, Sabatini, Strevett, Zaman; Associate Professors Hatami, Pei, Ramseyer, Volz; Assistant Professors Dreibelbis, Dresback, Floyd, Harvey, Wang.

Degrees Offered 

  • Bachelor of Science in Architectural Engineering
  • Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering
  • Bachelor of Science in Environmental Engineering
  • Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science
  • Bachelor of Science in Architectural Engineering/Master of Science
  • Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering/Master of Science
  • Bachelor of Science in Environmental Engineering/Master of Science
  • Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science/Master of Environmental Science
  • Master of Science
  • Master of Science in Environmental Engineering
  • Master of Environmental Science
  • Doctor of Philosophy 

General Information 

Architectural engineers design buildings and other structures, but the design of a building involves far more than just its external appearance. Buildings must be structurally sound, have adequate mechanical, plumbing and lighting systems, and must be economical to construct. Architectural engineers consider all these factors when they design buildings and other structures. 

Civil engineering is the oldest of the modern engineering disciplines, with historical roots dating back to the 1700s. Civil engineers are responsible for the design and construction of society’s infrastructure, such as buildings, highways, bridges, mass transit systems, dams and locks, and municipal water and sewage treatment systems. They often are responsible for planning, managing, operating and maintaining these facilities.

Using the principles of physics, biology and chemistry, environmental engineers develop methods to meet such environmental challenges as water and wastewater treatment, air pollution control, solid and hazardous waste management, waste recycling, and water resources management.

Environmental scientists have a variety of job responsibilities, including collecting and analyzing air, water and soil samples; monitoring compliance with environmental laws and regulation; and addressing public meetings on local environmental challenges.

Through a community of scholars committed to excellence in research and teaching, the mission of CEES is to provide our students with the technical education and critical thinking skills needed to lead the country in addressing the complex infrastructure and environmental problems facing today’s society.

The School of Civil Engineering and Environmental Science (CEES) provides broad based education for architectural, civil and environmental engineers and for environmental scientists. For undergraduate engineering majors, the first two years of study concentrate on the fundamentals of mathematics and engineering science, in common with all engineering students. Using this as a foundation, the last two years of civil engineering include required courses in soil mechanics, structural analysis and design, environmental engineering, hydraulics and hydrodynamics. In the senior year, professional electives enable development in one of the sub-areas of civil engineering. Students are encouraged to choose electives in structural, geotechnical, geoenvironmental, environmental, or water resources engineering. The curriculum for the undergraduate program in environmental engineering is similar to that of the civil engineering undergraduate program for the first two years. However, during the last two years, students complete coursework which is more focused on the environmental applications of civil engineering. The technical electives cover the areas of hydrology, water and wastewater treatment, solid and hazardous waste, and environmental science and occupational health. Students enrolled in the architectural engineering program take the same core engineering, mathematics, science, and English courses taken by other engineering students. They also take a series of architectural courses from the College of Architecture. During the last two years, they take structural engineering courses from CEES. Environmental scientists must keep pace with changing environmental concerns and areas of emphasis. In addition, the wide range of environmental management opportunities requires that the environmental scientist be well trained in the fundamental physical and biological sciences. Accordingly, the undergraduate environmental science curriculum focuses on the fundamentals of mathematics, chemistry, life sciences (zoology, microbiology, botany) and environmental science for the first three years, with professional and track electives during the senior year. Undergraduate students also take courses in English, political science, history, and humanities. The successful engineer or scientist must be able to communicate ideas and plans with colleagues and supervisors. He or she understands that the professional responsibility of the engineer or scientist is to provide cost-effective technological solutions that meet the growing needs of society.

Facilities and programs

Special Facilities and Programs 


RESEARCH FACILITIES 

CEES has laboratory facilities for teaching and research in environmental science and engineering, geotechnical engineering and structural engineering.

The Donald G. Fears Structural Engineering laboratory is devoted to teaching and research programs in geotechnical and structural engineering. Fears Lab now hosts structural engineering and structural mechanics research efforts at the University of Oklahoma, as well as some structural engineering faculty and staff.  And since 2004, the lab facility also serves as the home for the ODOT Bridge Squad internship program, where several OU Civil Engineering undergraduate students study bridge engineering under the mentorship of practicing bridge engineers from the Oklahoma Department of Transportation.

The mission of the Water Technologies for Emerging Regions Center is to promote peace by advancing health, education, and economic development through sustainable water and sanitation solutions for impoverished regions, using innovative teaching, research, and service / leadership activities. The vision of the WaTER Center is to pioneer integrated solutions that revolutionize development and adoption of sustainable water and sanitation technologies for developing countries through teaching, research and service innovations. This is done through integrating technological, business and human factors in pursuit of sustainable water and sanitation solutions.

The Center for Restoration of Ecosystems and Watersheds was founded at the University of Oklahoma, USA in late 2004. The mission of CREW is to perform comprehensive evaluations of environmental impact and to develop sustainable environmental remediation and restoration technologies based on ecological engineering techniques. Ecological engineering is the design and construction of sustainable ecosystems that integrate human society with its natural environment for the benefit of both. It uses a systems perspective based on the premise that sustainable solutions require working with natural ecological and biogeochemical processes and not against them. Ecologically engineered systems are designed to require less fossil fuel input, produce less pollution and represent cost-effective alternatives to traditional energy- and resource-intensive technologies.

The Hydrometeorology and Remote Sensing Laboratory is a transdisciplinary research unit with synergy at the interface of remote sensing technology, water, weather, and climate. Scales of interest for modeling and prediction include the local, state, regional and global scales.

Research sponsored by Institute for Applied Surfactant Research encompasses a wide spectrum of technological applications. However, members of the Institute strongly believe that the underlying forces responsible for the phenomena of surfactant behavior must be understood in order to provide a firm basis for applying knowledge to practical problems. Fundamental research is a basic part of the program at IASR, both in relation to specific technological problems and as a part of the larger goal of improving our understanding of surfactant behavior in general.

Established in September 1992, the Integrated PoroMechanics Institute is a multidisciplinary research unit of the University of Oklahoma, Norman. The IPMI offices and laboratories are located in the Sarkeys Energy Center, a 340,000 square foot complex at the northeast corner of the campus housing more than 200 teaching and research laboratories. Research at the IPMI is related to the understanding and application of the mechanics of porous media in general and the investigation of rock mechanics as applied to the exploration and production of hydrocarbons in particular. As such, IPMI serves both the petroleum industry and the wider geomechanics community. In addition, the IPMI provides state-of-the-art facilities for conducting research and educating university students on poromechanical testing.

CEES maintains geotechnical engineering and unsaturated soil mechanics laboratories in the Carson Engineering Center (CEC). The Ray Broce Materials Laboratory located in the Engineering Lab (EL) building has facilities for testing of pavement materials including conventional and performance-related testing of asphalt mixes. Most laboratory equipment in these labs is connected to fully automated data acquisition systems. Facilities for evaluation of rheological properties of asphalt binders are available in the Asphalt Rheology Laboratory located in the Sarkeys Energy Center. 

Several computer systems within CEES and OU support numerical and analytical research and teaching. Computing hardware ranges from Intel-based PCs to supercomputers available through OU Supercomputing Center for Education and Research (OSCER). OU is part of the Internet 2 consortium and high-speed access to the Internet is ubiquitously available on- and off-campus.

CEES has two designated research computer laboratories. The GIS and Environmental Modeling Laboratory and the Geo-Computational Modeling Laboratory are housed in Carson Engineering Center and used for both teaching and research. In addition, CEES has a student computing laboratory for general purpose usage by all CEES students.

undergraduate study

Undergraduate Study 


BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ARCHITECTURAL ENGINEERING 

(Accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET

Program Educational Objectives 

  • The Architectural Engineering Bachelor of Science alumni will have embarked on successful careers in the areas associated with the development, implementation, and management of architectural engineering systems. 
  • The Architectural Engineering Bachelor of Science alumni will advance in their careers and continue their professional development through continuing education and lifelong learning. 

This program requires a minimum of 130 credit hours with a minimum grade point average of 2.0 (combined and at OU, in the major, curriculum and overall). For detailed semester by semester curriculum requirements, please consult OU Engineering degree requirements.

Three of the 12 General Education elective hours (one course each from Social Science, Artistic Forms, Western Civilization, and Non-Western Culture) must be at the upper-division level (3000-4000). 

All Gallogly College of Engineering students are required to make a minimum grade of C in each course presented for the degree. Also, students must make a C in each prerequisite course before progressing to the next course(s). 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING 

(Accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET)

Program Educational Objectives 

  • The Civil Engineering Bachelor of Science alumni will have embarked on successful careers in the areas associated with the development, implementation, and management of civil engineering systems. 
  • The Civil Engineering Bachelor of Science alumni will advance in their careers and continue their professional development through continuing education and lifelong learning. 

This program requires a minimum of 126 credit hours with a minimum grade point average of 2.0 (combined and at OU, in the major, curriculum and overall). For detailed semester by semester curriculum requirements, please consult OU Engineering degree requirements.

Three of the 12 General Education elective hours (one course each from Social Science, Artistic Forms, Western Civilization, and Non-Western Culture) must be at the upper-division level (3000-4000). 

All Gallogly College of Engineering students are required to make a minimum grade of C in each course presented for the degree. Also, students must make a C in each prerequisite course before progressing to the next course(s). 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING 

(Accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET)

Program Educational Objectives 

  • The Environmental Engineering Bachelor of Science alumni will have embarked on successful careers in the areas associated with the development, implementation, and management of environmental engineering systems. 
  • The Environmental Engineering Bachelor of Science alumni will advance in their careers and continue their professional development through continuing education and lifelong learning. 

This program requires a minimum of 125 credit hours with a minimum grade point average of 2.0 (combined and at OU, in the major, curriculum and overall). For detailed semester by semester curriculum requirements, please consult OU Engineering degree requirements.

Three of the 12 General Education elective hours (one course each from Social Science, Artistic Forms, Western Civilization, and Non-Western Culture) must be at the upper-division level (3000-4000). 

All Gallogly College of Engineering students are required to make a minimum grade of C in each course presented for the degree. Also, students must make a C in each prerequisite course before progressing to the next course(s).

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE 

This program requires a minimum of 121 credit hours with a minimum grade point average of 2.0 (combined and at OU, in the major, curriculum and overall). For detailed semester by semester curriculum requirements, please consult OU Engineering degree requirements.

Three of the 12 General Education elective hours (one course each from Social Science, Artistic Forms, Western Civilization, and Non-Western Culture) must be at the upper-division level (3000-4000). 

All Gallogly College of Engineering students are required to make a minimum grade of C in each course presented for the degree. Also, students must make a C in each prerequisite course before progressing to the next course(s). 

Graduate Study

Graduate Study 

The School of Civil Engineering and Environmental Science offers master’s and doctoral programs in civil and environmental engineering and environmental science. 

The following paragraphs present only the standard minimum requirements and are no more than guidelines, not intended to exclude consideration of any valid academic objectives. The admission evaluation, the academic plan, and the research studies of each student should represent a unique synthesis of program strengths and resources with the student’s background and aspirations.  

Areas of Specialization 

Environmental engineering, environmental science, geotechnical engineering, groundwater quality management, structural engineering, water resources and water quality management. Selection of an option should be made as early as possible, but not later than the regular enrollment period for which the student will have accumulated 15 hours of graduate credit. An early decision is strongly encouraged because all options may not be available at all times. A graduate student is admitted into an area of specialization; any subsequent change in the area of specialization is to be petitioned to the School of Civil Engineering and Environmental Science Graduate Studies Committee. Usually a change is permitted if the student is in good graduate standing and meets the entrance criteria of the specialty area. 

Prospective students can obtain additional information through the School's website or application materials may be requested by writing to the School or contacting the graduate programs assistant by e-mail

Financial Assistance 

Applications for financial assistance should be directed to the School of Civil Engineering and Environmental Science. Research assistants typically write their thesis or dissertation on the subject for which financial support is received. Teaching assistants often teach laboratory sections and/or grade papers. 

Instructors’ positions are occasionally available for advanced graduate students, particularly those interested in a university teaching career. Graduate students whose native language is not English must pass an English proficiency exam before being allowed positions as instructors.  

Accelerated Dual Degree B.S./M.S. 

The School of Civil Engineering and Environmental Science offers Accelerated Dual Degree (B.S./M.S.) programs to qualified undergraduate students. The programs allow students to pursue a graduate degree in conjunction with the undergraduate degree requirements. Students accepted into the programs can use two professional elective courses (six credit hours) to simultaneously satisfy the requirements of both the B.S. and M.S. degrees. With proper planning, the Accelerated BS/MS Programs allow students to complete their MS Thesis or non-thesis degree requirements in less time than is possible in the traditional program. Students are encouraged to apply two semesters prior to graduation and must have a GPA of 3.2 or better in the last 60 hours of the undergraduate curriculum. The programs are not available to transfer students beyond junior standing. Final acceptance to the graduate program is subject to approval of the CEES Graduate Studies Committee and Dean of the Graduate College. The Bachelor of Science portions of the Architectural Engineering, Civil Engineering, and Environmental Engineering Accelerated Dual Degree programs are accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET

Master of Science (Civil Engineering or Environmental Engineering) 

For admission to an area of specialization leading to the Master of Science degree in Civil or Environmental Engineering, the student must meet the general requirements of the Graduate College and must have previously fulfilled the requirements equivalent to the Bachelor of Science in Civil or Environmental Engineering. See Graduate Student Admission for specific admission information. Undergraduate background deficiencies will be determined by the School’s Graduate Studies Committee and must be satisfied before the student is granted full admission to the Graduate College. See the Graduate College website for in depth information about English Proficiency Requirements for all applicants for whom English is a second language.

Two options are available within the Master of Science degree programs: thesis and non-thesis. Master’s degree programs which require a thesis consist of at least 30 credit hours. All non-thesis master’s degree programs require at least 32 credit hours. The master’s degree requires the equivalent of at least two semesters of satisfactory graduate work and additional work as may be prescribed for the degree. All coursework applied to the master’s degree must carry graduate credit.

Master of Environmental Science 

For admission into an area of specialization leading to the Master of Environmental Science degree, the student must meet the general requirements of the Graduate College and must have previously fulfilled the requirements equivalent to a bachelor’s degree in an appropriate area approved by the School. See Graduate Student Admission for specific admission information. See the Graduate College website for in depth information about English Proficiency Requirements for all applicants for whom English is a second language.

The Master of Environmental Science degree is designed for students interested in applying the principles of science to a better understanding of the environment and its control. The degree program is concerned with the chemical, physical and biological nature of the environment and its management. Enough flexibility is maintained so that candidates have the opportunity to strengthen their basic field (e.g., chemistry, engineering, physics, or biology) or their elected professional area of concentration. These areas include water resources, groundwater quality management, air resources, hazardous and solid waste management, environmental impact assessment, industrial hygiene and risk assessment. 

Two options are available within the Master of Environmental Science degree program: thesis and non-thesis. Master’s degree programs which require a thesis consist of at least 30 credit hours. All non-thesis master’s degree programs require at least 32 credit hours. The master’s degree requires the equivalent of at least two semesters of satisfactory graduate work and additional work as may be prescribed for the degree. All coursework applied to the master’s degree must carry graduate credit.

Doctor of Philosophy 

The Doctor of Philosophy degree program is concerned with the expansion of professional knowledge in the fundamental concepts of civil engineering or environmental science. Admission to the Ph.D. program requires a master’s degree with a high scholastic standing. See Graduate Student Admission for specific admission information.  See the Graduate College website for in depth information about English Proficiency Requirements for all applicants for whom English is a second language.

As part of the Ph.D. degree, the student is expected to produce a research dissertation of professional significance that could be the basis of one or more papers published in refereed journals. Ninety semester hours of graduate-level coursework beyond a B.S. degree are required plus a general examination, proficiency in a research skill and an acceptable dissertation. The graduate Ph.D. is prepared for a career in teaching, research and consulting.