School of Social Work

Julie Miller-Cribbs, Director
David McLeod, Graduate Program Coordinator (Norman)
Lori Franklin, Graduate Coordinator (Tulsa)
Christina Miller, Assistant Director/Undergraduate Program Coordinator

Norman Campus
700 Elm Avenue room 356
Norman, OK 73019
Phone: (405)325-2821
Fax: (405) 325-4683
email: ouswk-norman@ou.edu

Tulsa Campus
4502 E. 41st Rm. 3J05
Tulsa, OK 74135
Phone: (918) 660-3385
Fax: 918-660-3383
email: ouswk-tulsa@ou.edu

Internet: http://socialwork.ou.edu/

General Information

Faculty Roster

Professors Davidson, Hill, Miller-Cribbs, Moxley; Associate Professors Byers, Franklin, Gray, Miller, Natale; Assistant Professors McLeod, Munoz, Noyori-Corbett; Clinical Associate Professor Wells; Clinical Assistant Professors Brady, Brandt, Dothard, Peterson, Gandy-Guedes, Kratz, Massey, Pettigrew, Riley.

Degrees Offered

  • Bachelor of Arts
  • Master of Social Work
  • Master of Social Work/Master of Public Health
  • Master of Social Work and Master of Arts in International Studies

Information on both undergraduate and graduate programs is included. However, the general information contained in this section mainly covers undergraduate study. Additional information on graduate programs is available from the Graduate College

General Information

Social work education has been a part of the curriculum at the University of Oklahoma since 1916-17. A separate School of Social Work was established in 1935. The two-year graduate program was fully accredited in 1957 and has maintained continuous accreditation. The undergraduate degree program gained approval in 1970 and has been continuously accredited since the inception of undergraduate accreditation in 1974. Both programs continue to maintain full accredited status from the Council on Social Work Education. 

Social work is a profession devoted to the enhancement of human well-being and to the alleviation of poverty and oppression. Social workers strive to promote the empowerment and well-being of individuals, families, communities, and organizations in an increasingly global society. The expansion of human service programs and areas of practice utilizing social work knowledge and skills has created a demand for professional social workers. Social work offers a challenging and exciting career for the individual who is motivated to help others and has a personal commitment to the advancement of social justice. 

The School prepares practitioners who will use an integrated combination of theories, conceptual knowledge, values, and skills to serve diverse client and community systems. The undergraduate program and the foundation requirements of the graduate program are based on a generalist model that emphasizes skills, knowledge, and values basic to all social work practice. In their final year of graduate study, students take one of two advanced concentrations: 1) Direct Practice (DP), or 2) Administration and Community Practice (ACP) offered at both campuses, Norman and Tulsa.

The curriculum recognizes the importance of moving students forward through approaches to mastery and competence that instills within students the necessary attitudes, motivation, knowledge, and skills required for sound practice. The curriculum prepares students for life-long learning within specific domains of their own choosing.  Each degree program anticipates student movement into particular domains formed by human need and social issues, social policies, systems of care, and particular organizations.

Programs for Academic Excellence

The Anne and Henry Zarrow School of Social Work advances relevant and high-quality knowledge and values of social work practice useful in preparing competent social workers who can elevate the status of people, populations or communities that experience considerable vulnerability and injustice within Oklahoma and the broader society.

In keeping with its mission statement, the University of Oklahoma Anne and Henry Zarrow School of Social Work strives to reach people, populations or communities that experience considerable vulnerability and injustice within Oklahoma and the broader society. These Centers and Special Programs are key components of making our mission a reality.

Child Welfare Professional Enhancement Program

The Child Welfare Professional Enhancement Program (CWPEP) is a title IV-E partnership between the University of Oklahoma, The Oklahoma Department of Human Services, and the US Department of Health and Human Services Administration for Children and Families. The purpose of this partnership is to enhance and support Oklahoma's public child welfare workforce.

Knee Center for Strong Families

The Knee Center for Strong Families sponsors academic and community-oriented programs in the fields of social work, public health (including mental health), and fine arts in three core areas: Visiting lectureships, workshops, seminars, meetings of scholars, conferences, symposia, and forums; planning grants or "seed money" to develop programs that might have continuous funding from other sources; and underwriting research on the planning and development of educational programs to enhance family life in Oklahoma.

Center for Social Work in Healthcare

The Center for Social Work in Healthcare is dedicated to promoting and supporting the optimal use of the social work profession in health care settings, with an emphasis on primary health care settings.  This is accomplished through the provision of educational opportunities and supports to social work students who have demonstrated an interest in interdisciplinary practice in health care. The center supports and participates in Oklahoma projects and programs focused on improving primary and community health, and supporting the increased use of evidence based social work practice in health care. In addition, the Center provides technical assistance and resources to primary care practices that are interested in developing social work positions within their practices, or improving the use of social work in their interdisciplinary teams.

Continuing Education

The Anne and Henry Zarrow School of Social Work Program for Continuing Education seeks to provide high quality continuing education events to Oklahoma social workers. Events are held on both the Norman and Tulsa campuses as well as Northwest Oklahoma.


 

Scholarships and Financial Aid

Scholarship and Financial Aid

The Anne and Henry Zarrow School of Social Work is dedicated to helping students fund their education by providing opportunities for internal (within the University) as well as external (outside of the University) scholarships.

OU also offers a wide variety of scholarships as does the College of Arts and Sciences. All financial need based scholarships for both undergraduate and graduate students are available through the Centralized Academic Scholarship Hub (CASH).

The School of Social Work provides a limited number of departmental scholarships to qualified students in the Social Work program. For graduate students, information about how to complete the online application is disseminated in the spring semester to both current students and new admits via email. Undergraduate students should apply through OU's Centralized Academic Scholarship Hub (CASH) for all departmental, college, and need based scholarships

The school has a limited number of Graduate Research Assistant positions available that offer both a tuition waiver, a stipend, and health insurance. Information about how to apply for a GRA position is disseminated in the spring semester to both current students (via email) and new students (via acceptance packets) or as information becomes available.

OU Financial Aid Services administers federal, state, institutional and private aid programs.

The Child Welfare Professional Enhancement Program (CWPEP) is a stipend and tuition assistance program specifically designed to encourage future MSWs and BSWs to work in the child welfare field.

The Zarrow Mental Health Stipends support students in Masters level foundation and concentration year practica in Tulsa.

The Center for Social Work in Healthcare provides stipends for students interested in a health-related practicum.

Leadership Education in Neuro-developmental and Related Disabilities (LEND) is a nationwide training program sponsored by the Maternal Child Health Bureau of the United States Department of Health and Human Services. In Oklahoma, LEND prepares graduate students for leadership roles as professionals with interdisciplinary skills to support community-based partnerships with professional colleagues, clients, and families.  

Undergraduate Study

Undergraduate Study

The undergraduate social work program is designed to prepare social workers to assume entry-level professional roles in human and social service systems. In addition to the academic expectations, social work students are expected to demonstrate professional behavior which reflects a commitment to the ethics of the social work profession. 

The role of the social worker involves helping people from a variety of backgrounds and with a range of problems, so it is important that the social work student not permit personal issues to interfere with this role and that the student have the emotional and psychological resources to render effective assistance to those in need. 

Graduates of the baccalaureate program are eligible for membership in the National Association of Social Workers. They are also eligible to apply for advanced standing in the M.S.W. program at the University of Oklahoma or other graduate programs in social work. Following two years of supervised practice, they are eligible to apply for a license in the State of Oklahoma. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

See BSW Admission Information for admission information, or contact ouswk-norman@ou.edu for more information.

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

The undergraduate social work curriculum is highly structured and requires no less than four semesters to complete all course requirements. 

Students must earn a Combined Retention GPA of 2.50 to graduate with the Social Work Bachelor of Arts, with a grade of “C” or better in all social work courses. Additionally, students must earn a grade of “S” (satisfactory) in both practicum courses taken in the senior year.

The School of Social Work fully subscribes to and is guided by the NASW Code of Ethics. Social work program applicants and students are expected to demonstrate professional behavior which reflects a commitment to the ethics of the social work profession as exemplified in the Code of Ethics. Behavior and statements contrary to these ethical principles may result in denial admission or review of continuance in the School’s programs. Examples of behavior which warrant such denial or a review include, but are not limited to, derogatory oral and written statements towards other students, faculty, and/or persons from populations reflecting racial, ethnic, handicapped status, religious, socioeconomic, gender, and sexual orientation differences. Students are responsible for knowing and adhering to the NASW Code of Ethics. The most recent version can be read and downloaded from the internet through the national NASW website

Additionally, the School publishes its own standards compatible with NASW in its Student Performance Policy (PDF).

The undergraduate social work program is built upon a strong liberal arts foundation that emphasizes a bio-psycho-social perspective. To assure that social work majors have been introduced to fundamental concepts within this perspective, the following prerequisites (or course content equivalents) are required before initial coursework begins in fall of the beginning of major coursework:

  • PSY 1113, Elements of Psychology 
  • SOC 1113, Introduction to Sociology 
  • BIOL 1005, Concepts in Biology, or BIOL 1013, Introduction to Biology, or BIOL 1114, Introductory Zoology (with or without BIOL 1121)
  • S WK 2113, Introduction to Social Work (This course may be transferred from other institutions if a syllabus has already been approved. Currently, syllabi from Oklahoma City Community College and Rose State College are accepted without the need for review. Syllabi from other institutions must be submitted to the Undergraduate Program Director for approval.

Additionally, an introductory course in statistics must be taken BEFORE the beginning of research courses in the senior year. This is typically achieved through SWK 2223, Statistics for Social Work, offered in the second semester of the program (spring). However, students may meet this requirement with any approved statistics course (at OU PSY 2113, ECON 2843) with content similar to SWK 2223. Other than those listed, students must submit syllabi for approval. Also note that SWK 2223 meets General Education requirements for Core Area I mathematics.

Listed below are the required courses for Social Work majors and the order in which they will be taken. 

  • Junior Year FALL — S WK 3003, 3103, 3233, 3323 
  • Junior Year SPRING — S WK 2223 (unless a substitute is offered) 3113, 3243, 3313 
  • Senior Year FALL — S WK 4083, 4103, 4311, 4315 
  • Senior Year SPRING — S WK 4093, 4325, 4331 

Students who have completed similar coursework from an accredited social work program may have those credit hours transferred. A copy of the previous course syllabus will be reviewed by the Undergraduate Program Coordinator for necessary action. The student is notified whether credit is approved. Students should provide these materials to their advisor as soon as possible.

FIELD EDUCATION

Field education or “Practicum” is the cornerstone of social work education and allows social work students to put classroom learning into practice. The University of Oklahoma Anne and Henry Zarrow School of Social Work (OUAHZSSW) works with well over 300 affiliated agencies and facilities across Oklahoma to offer social work students direct learning experiences with individuals, families, groups, and communities. Sites provide students with the structure, supervision and resources for appropriate learning. Field instructors, who are employees of the site, provide on-site social work field education and supervision. Regular and adjunct faculty assigned to the Practicum Program serve as liaison faculty and work with sites and instructors to insure high quality experiences for both undergraduate and graduate students. A total of 600 clock hours must be spent in undergraduate practicum placement. Generally, students spend 20-24 hours each week at their site and earn 300 hours each semester. Undergraduate students completing a practicum must be concurrently enrolled in required classroom courses. The MSW program requires a total of 1010 clock hours in practicum placement. Students earn 460 hours in their first year of graduate school and the remaining 550 in their second year. Students who enter the MSW program in Advanced Standing have fulfilled the first-year practicum requirement as a part of their BSW program and complete 550 hours in practicum in their concentration year. See Frequently Asked Questions for additional information on Field Education.

Graduate Study

Graduate Study


GENERAL INFORMATION

Social Work is a profession devoted to the enhancement of human well-being and to the alleviation of poverty and oppression. This is accomplished through the promotion, restoration, maintenance and enhancement of the social functioning of individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities. The expansion of human service programs and areas of practice that utilize social work knowledge and skills has created a demand for professional social workers. Social work offers a challenging and exciting career for the individual who is motivated to help others and has a personal commitment to the advancement of social justice. 

The Master of Social Work degree (MSW) is designed to prepare students for advanced professional practice within an organizational context. Two major professional roles predominate. The first of these is direct social work practice with individuals, families and groups. The second is focused on administration, planning, and community organization. In recognition of these two distinct areas of practice, the school offers two areas of advanced concentration: direct practice and administration and community practice. The MSW is offered in both Norman and OU-Tulsa in both full-time and part-time format.  The master’s degree program in social work requires 60 credit hours. The foundation is comprised of 30 credit hours and may be completed either through the on-campus full-time program or through the school’s program of part-time studies described below. The advanced curriculum is a full-time in-residence program, with full-time status defined as enrollment in not less than nine credit hours per semester. Advanced Standing status is available to students who have completed a bachelor’s degree in social work from an accredited program with the past five years and who meet additional criteria. 

The school prepares practitioners who are capable of using an integrated combination of knowledge, values, and skills in service to various client and community systems. The undergraduate and the foundation requirements of the graduate program are based on a generalist model emphasizing skills, knowledge and values basic to all social work practice. The candidacy year of graduate study is organized into two graduate concentrations: direct practice and administration and community practice.

ADMISSION

Admission to the Master of Social Work program is to either the 60 credit-hour program or to the Advanced Standing (33 credit hour) program. Advanced Standing is available only to the applicants who have completed a Social Work bachelor degree from an accredited university within the last five years.

See MSW Admission Information for admission details, or contact ouswk-norman@ou.edu or ouswk-tulsa@ou.edu for more information.

TRANSFER CREDIT

The school accepts up to six hours of approved graduate course credit from another college or university or up to a full first year (30 hours) from a school of social work accredited by the Council on Social Work Education. This action is contingent upon the approval of the Director of the School and the Dean of the Graduate College.

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

Students in the 60-hour program come from a wide variety of backgrounds, no Social Work bachelor degree is required. It can be completed full-time in two years or part-time in three or four. The first 30 hours, called the foundation coursework, are general, foundation level social work courses. This coursework is the same for all students. After completing the first 30 hours of the program, students select their concentration and move into the concentration curriculum. The concentration curriculum makes up the remaining thirty hours. Two concentrations are offered: Direct Practice and Administration and Community Practice. The courses in the concentration curriculum vary depending on which concentration is chosen. Both concentrations contain a Thesis and a Non-Thesis track.

The 33-hour Advanced Standing program is for students who have graduated with a Social Work bachelor degree from an accredited university within the last five years. Students select a concentration upon entering the program; both concentrations contain a Thesis and a Non-Thesis track. The Advanced Standing Program can be completed on a full time or part time basis.

TIME LIMIT AND READMISSION

All students must complete the degree requirements within a five-calendar year period from the time of first admission. A student who has successfully completed the first year or any part of the program in the school and withdraws for any reason must reapply to the Office of Admissions & Recruitment and to the School of Social Work. The student is subject to the regulations applicable during his/her first term of enrollment so long as continuous enrollments are maintained. A student who interrupts enrollment for one year or more and is readmitted will then be subject to the regulations in effect at the time of readmission. If readmitted to the program, all previous required coursework must have been completed within the five calendar-year period or the coursework must be retaken. The five-year requirement also applies to Advanced Standing students. 

DUAL DEGREES

Master of Social Work and Master of Public Health - The joint MSW-MPH program seeks to strengthen public health social work through coursework graduate social work students undertake in both programs.

Master of Social Work and Master of Arts in International Studies - The joint MSW-MAIS program seeks to prepare students for a globally integrated practice environment that addresses global social, political and economic justice issues, whether in the realm of international diplomacy, the international economy, humanitarian aid and economic development assistance, or international advocacy.

CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS

The Anne and Henry Zarrow School of Social Work offers several certificate programs, Women's and Gender Studies Certificate, Graduate Certificate in Public Health, and Social Work with American Indians. These are independent from the degree even though courses overlap. Certificates cannot be added post-graduation. Typically obtaining a certificate does not add courses to your degree but rather specifies the electives taken.